Shipwrecks on the south west coast of the Isle of Wight


Cedarine
Came to grief: 2nd April 1862 at/near Brighstone Grange
Captain T. Dill
Cargo: 191 Convicts
Crew of 13
Lifeboats present:
Rescue
Coxswain:
James Buckett

The barque, Cedarine, built in Bermuda was on her maiden voyage from Bermuda to Portsmouth when she ran aground about 100 yards east of Brighstone Grange in the early hours of 2nd April 1862.
She had on board 191 convicts (some reports say 350) returning home after their periods of servitude. The lifeboat 'Rescue' landed 134 of those on board, the remainder being rescued by the coastguard service. The convicts, having next to nobody to restrain them, drank the local inns dry and moved inland in search of more. They were eventually rounded up by military personnel from Parkhurst Barracks, but it was several days before they were all accounted for.
Local accounts relate that in some cases, the soldiers were as drunk as the convicts.

The Cedarine became a total loss, but her cedar planks were salvaged and used in the repair of the roof of the chancel in the church at Mottistone. Doubtless other local buildings were repaired at the same time.

The picture is part of a small copy of a painting by Earl Bailly, a polio victim, who painted it with the brush held between his teeth. The original hangs in The Earl Bailly Art Gallery, Shelly Bay, Bermuda.

Fatalities: None